Guest blog by exhibiting artist Hilary Mayo

A teenage boy with a beautiful, beaming face approached me. He had a board hung round his neck on which was a collection of earrings, none of them matching. Each was made from found objects, which he sold to scrape together a living on the streets of Vidigal, one of the many favelas (shanty towns) that clings to a steep hillside in Rio de Janeiro, where life is tough and the cycle of poverty is hard to break. The feather earring I bought is the inspiration behind several vessels in my exhibition at The New Craftsman Gallery.

I met this boy whilst volunteering at the Street Child World Cup in Rio de Janeiro ( http://www.streetchildunited.org ) a charity that uses sport and art to change the lives of street children.

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This body of work comes from the heart. I returned from Rio very affected by my experience working with street children and I put this into my making. Each vessel tells a story and reflects the landscape of the favelas. I work from photographs and memory. The hand built abstracted forms began life as domestic vessels; pots, pans, jugs; symbolic of home; many show traces of broken handles. Fine rims and cracked glazes suggest fragility, and each is hand painted with many layers of slip, glaze, oxide and stain.


pink building

My interest in the plight of street children began in Durban, South Africa, in 2007 when visiting Umthombo, a local street child charity founded by inspirational couple, Tom Hewitt, MBE, and his wife Mandi, an ex street child with an extraordinary story who grew up on a rubbish dump in South Africa.  Tom’s current project is Surfers Not Street Children a charity that uses surfing to get children off the streets. You can read some of their stories at  http://tomhewitt.org/surfing/

See Hilary Mayo’s work at New Craftsman now and until 27th June.