Archives for posts with tag: Matthew Lanyon

IMG_1082Before writing this blog, I came from my studio and noticed some broken pieces of industrial rubber sitting by the curb. Hardened from weathering and worn by vehicles driving over them, the crackled black surface retained a striking yellow streak. To most, their presence would go unnoticed, but to me, as a ceramic artist, they possessed a visual potential that I instinctively knew could lead to a new series of works.

IMG_7265It may seem obvious to say that observation is an invaluable part of an artist’s practice, but for me, it’s a research method and form of image collection that I have developed over the years – from drawing and painting in sketchbooks and making cardboard maquettes to forming slabs in clay. Observation has become as integral to my process as making and firing, and without the ability to observe and record my surroundings I think my work would be very different.

I like the notion that from a small mark on a wall, a spray-painted number on a paving slab, a rusted sheet of corrugated metal or broken piece of rubber, it is possible to see beyond ideas of unsightly detritus and reinterpret those markings or objects through the creative process.

IMG_7781I’ve been working with clay for the past 20 years. For me, clay is a material that’s always challenging, yet ideal for creating the forms I wish to make. It can be unpredictable, and hard work, but ultimately rewarding and gives me scope to define my interest in the relationship between industry and nature. Working with clay also means working with a specific series of tools: a kiln, cutting and rolling equipment, slips, oxides and glazes are all vital to the physical process of ceramics, but something that’s invaluable to me and an integral part of my own creative process, is the ability to observe the world around me and to translate these observations into clay.

Rebecca Appleby, September 2016RA_ceramic

Rebecca Appleby | Urban Palimpsest  is on show at New Craftsman from 10 September to 8 October alongside Matthew Lanyon | In The Tracks of the Yellow Dog, with sculpture by Breon O’Casey and ceramics by Matthew Chambers.


Journey Jar

This evening sees the opening of our much anticipated Easter exhibition, so we’re busy putting the final touches to our show as St Ives’ long awaited half term visitors grace Fore Street and the town gets back into its busy seasonal swing.

We’re incredibly proud to be showing the work of ceramicist Adam Buick, who has exhibited regularly at NC for the past four years and in 2013 was nominated for the prestigious Jerwood Makers Prize. And as if having this year’s most high profile British maker at NC wasn’t enough, Adam has created an exclusive collection for our show using Cornish materials including China Clay from Tresowen and Doble’s clay pit St.Agnes, granite dust from Castle-an-Dinas Quarry and metal ore from Porthtowan. We think Buick’s Korean inspired Moon Jars – whether two feet tall or small enough to fit in the palm of your hand – are among the most beautiful ceramics on the arts scene today.

Accompanying him is another of the UKs most celebrated craftsmen, whose talent with hot glass has made his London Glassblowing Studio one of the most influential glass studios in the world. Peter Layton’s distinctive, richly coloured works exude real passion and are dazzling here on show in the early spring sunshine. Layton’s spirited pieces are set against a new collection of works by well-loved St Ives artist Emma Jeffryes, whose paintings are filled with all the contrasting splash and serenity of life here on St Ives bay. All three of these outstanding artists will be at our Private View party tonight along with our many friends and clients, and we’ll be launching our 2014 season in style!

We’ve lots to look forward to this year, with forthcoming shows by painters Lucie Bray, Neil Davies and Matthew Lanyon, ceramicists Akiko Hirai, Chris Keenan and Matthew Chambers and craftsmen Guy Royle and Breon O’casey among others. And while we are on the subject of extraordinary talent – take a look at this video of the work of Rebecca McDonald, who thrilled us with the most spectacular exhibition here at NC in December. We dare you not to fall in love with her as much as we have!

Image /  Adam Buick, Moon Jar from the Cornish Series